EU-Kommission setzt auf Open Access und veröffentlicht Empfehlungen an die Mitgliedstaaten

Die EU-Kommissarinnen Neelie Kroes (Digitale Agenda) und Maire Geoghegan-Quinn (Forschung, Innovation und Wissenschaft) haben heute in einer Pressekonferenz ihre Vorstellungen zur Umsetzung von Open Access zu wissenschaftlichen Publikationen und Forschungsdaten im Europäischen Forschungsraum (ERA) kommuniziert. Eine Pressemitteilung stellt die zentralen Punkte heraus:

„As a first step, the Commission will make open access to scientific publications a general principle of Horizon 2020, the EU’s Research & Innovation funding programme for 2014-2020. As of 2014, all articles produced with funding from Horizon 2020 will have to be accessible:

articles will either immediately be made accessible online by the publisher (‘Gold’ open access) – up-front publication costs can be eligible for reimbursement by the European Commission; or

researchers will make their articles available through an open access repository no later than six months (12 months for articles in the fields of social sciences and humanities) after publication (‘Green’ open access).“

Weiter wurde eine Vision der Verankerung von Open Access im Europäischen Forschungsraum (ERA) vorgestellt:

“The European Commission emphasises open access as a key tool to bring together people and ideas in a way that catalyses science and innovation. To ensure economic growth and to address the societal challenges of the 21st century, it is essential to optimise the circulation and transfer of scientific knowledge among key stakeholders in European research – universities, funding bodies, libraries, innovative enterprises, governments and policy-makers, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and society at large” (PDF)

In einem Kommuniqué an das Europäische Parlament wird der Stand von Open Access in Europa thematisiert. Dabei werden auch die Herausforderungen beschrieben:

„A key issue affecting access to and preservation of scientific information is the level of investment in the scientific dissemination system. The economic and societal potential of better access to scientific information will not be realised if budgets for accessing and preserving information are insufficient. Another problem is that action by the different Member States is uneven and, with some exceptions, uncoordinated. Concerted efforts, building on the definition and exchange of good practices, could lead to economies of scale and efficiency gains.“ (PDF)

Darüber hinaus haben die Kommissarinnen Empfehlungen an die Mitgliedstaaten vorgeschlagen. Ihr Anliegen ist, dass bis 2016 60% der Publikationen, die im Rahmen der öffentlichen Forschung in Europa entstehen, per open access frei zugänglich sind. In den Empfehlungen an die Mitgliedstaaten heißt es:

„Define clear policies for the dissemination of and open access to scientific publications resulting from publicly funded research. These policies should provide for: concrete objectives and indicators to measure progress; implementation plans, including the allocation of responsibilities; associated financial planning.” (PDF)

Auch Zugang und Nachnutzung von Forschungsdaten sollen deutliche verbessert werden. In den „Draft Recommendation on Access to and Preservation of Scientific Information” (PDF) findet sich folgende Empfehlung an die Mitgliedstaaten:

“Define clear policies for the dissemination of and open access to research data resulting from publicly funded research. These policies should provide for: concrete objectives and indicators to measure progress; implementation plans, including the allocation of responsibilities (including appropriate licensing); associated financial planning.”

Spannend wird nun sein, welche Wirkung die Empfehlungen auf Deutschland haben wird. Der Blick auf die jüngsten Entwicklungen in Großbritannien und Dänemark zeigt die rasant wachsende Verankerung des Themas in der europäischen Wissenschaftspolitik.

This entry was posted in Forschungsdaten, Open Access and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply